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How to Avoid Deposit Disputes as a Student Tenant

Salford student houses

Deposit disputes at student lettings can be stressful and time-consuming. Fortunately, with proper planning and preparation, most can be avoided altogether. As the new academic year begins, here are some things students should know about that reduce the likelihood of deposit disputes in our Salford student houses.

The Tenancy Deposit Protection (TDP) Scheme and Prescribed Information

When you have paid your deposit, the landlord must place it in one of three government-approved tenancy deposit schemes within thirty days of receiving it. This ensures that you will get your deposit back if you meet the terms of your tenancy agreement, don’t damage the property, and pay your rent and bills. The rule applies even if your deposit is paid by someone other than yourself, such as your parents.

Within the same timeframe of 30 days, your landlord must serve you the Prescribed Information, which includes the details you will need on the TDP scheme, including how the deposit is protected and how to apply to get it back.

If there is a dispute over how much of your deposit you will get back, it will be protected in the TDP scheme until the issue is resolved. When you have come to an agreement with your landlord, they have ten days to return the agreed amount to you.

The Tenancy Agreement

A tenancy agreement is a contract between you and your landlord. It can be written or verbal, though it is generally better to have a written contract so that everyone knows what is expected of them. It should lay out the important details and responsibilities relating to your tenancy, including:

  • Your name, the name of your landlord and the address of the property that is being let
  • The start and end dates of your tenancy
  • The rent amount and who is liable to pay it
  • What the rent includes, for example council tax or electricity bills
  • Cleaning and maintenance responsibilities. This should include the landlord’s obligations for making repairs to the property, and your responsibility to keep the property clean and tidy.

Sharing a house with other tenants

In addition to your tenancy agreement, it can be helpful to make a separate, informal agreement between yourself and the other tenants living at the property. It could be written or verbal, and might include the division of responsibilities like washing up and cleaning communal areas, and any rules to keep everybody happy, like not playing loud music after a certain time.

As well as maintaining good relationships between tenants, this could also benefit your relationship with your landlord by ensuring the house is kept in good condition and not disturbing the neighbours.

Helpful Tips

Know your landlord’s contact information

Your landlord must provide you with their name and address before they can charge rent. If you do not have this information, you can make a written request to the person who receives the rent for the full name and address of the landlord. They are then legally obliged to provide you with this information in writing within 21 days.

Start your search early for the next academic year

Landlords and student letting agents usually put their properties on the market early for the following academic year – often around mid-October. By taking advantage of this and finding your property early, you will have more properties to choose from and will be able to iron out all of the details with your landlord in plenty of time, reducing the risk of deposit disputes further down the line.

Further Information about our Salford student houses

Whilst following the advice here will significantly improve your chances of a dispute-free student tenancy, it doesn’t cover everything. To learn more about TDP schemes, tenancy agreements or anything else related to student lettings, contact us on 0800 500 3015 so we can advise you further.

Mistoria Estate Agents is one of the leading student lettings agencies in the North West, with offices in Manchester, Salford, Liverpool and Bolton. Our Comprehensive Property Protection means all properties go through our inventory service to include photographic or video evidence, protecting both landlord and tenant.

We are members of ARLA Propertymark which means we meet higher industry standards than the law demands. Our experts undertake regular training to ensure they are up to date with best practice and complex legislative changes so they can offer you the best advice. We are also backed by a Client Money Protection scheme which guarantees your money is protected.

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Your Guide to Guarantors

salford student lettings agency

When searching for your perfect student house, there’ll be many new terms and phrases you’ll hear for the first time. Renting is new territory and with it comes a whole load of new jargon to get your head around. One of them that will crop up all the time is ‘guarantors’. Before you dismiss the idea as no big deal, let us tell you a bit about the role of a guarantor…

What is a Guarantor?

A guarantor is someone who agrees to ensure that the tenant follows the terms of a tenancy and will step in to make up any shortfall if they don’t. This includes, but is not limited to, paying the rent if the tenant doesn’t. In short, if you decide to blow your student loan on an iPhone11 instead of your rent, your guarantor will have to cough up instead. Depending on the agreement, a guarantor’s liability can also include damages to the property.

A guarantor, particularly in the case of students, is often a parent or close relative of the tenant, but can be anyone that is prepared to take on the responsibility. The usual requirement for a guarantor is that they are employed, are a UK resident, have sufficient earnings to cover the tenant’s rent, or are a relative or family friend.

Why do I Need a Guarantor?

There are many different reasons tenants may be asked for a guarantor. Primarily, it’s down to their financial situation. If you have no credit history or a low credit score, are starting a new job, or are on a low salary, you’re paying rent via benefits, or if you’re a student, you’ll be asked to provide a guarantor.

Your new prospective landlord may wish to make the same checks on your guarantor as they will on you as the tenant to ensure they are ‘good for it’ and are able to pay, should they need to. Don’t underestimate the importance of a guarantor or the gravity of what you are asking them to do; you’re asking someone to lay bare their own financial circumstances, as well as be responsible for ensuring you stick to the terms of your lease.

The Process

When asking someone to be a guarantor for you, make sure they understand all that that entails. Provide them with a full copy of your tenancy agreement; don’t assume, or just ask them to sign it. In the worst case scenario, should you fall into rent arrears or cannot pay for any property damages that are your fault, you could be putting your guarantor in financial jeopardy. Be honest with your guarantor about what you’re asking of them and make the time to sit down with them and have a serious conversation about what it all means.

To make the process as easy as possible for all involved, and to build trust with your student landlord or student letting agency, following this sequence of steps will help:

  • Provide a reference for yourself as a tenant
  • Provide details and references for your guarantor
  • Send a draft, UNSIGNED, copy of the full tenancy agreement and the guarantor agreement to your chosen guarantor
  • Ask your guarantor to have their signing of the agreement witnessed, and dated
  • Send the signed agreements back to your landlord/letting agent in a timely manner
  • Sign the tenancy agreement in person, in front of the landlord or agent and ensure they do the same.

The Guarantor Agreement

Ensure the guarantor agreement includes the names of the landlord/letting agent and the tenant (you), as well as the address of the rental property.

It should also contain an explanation of exactly what the guarantor is liable for, as well as a description of the guarantor’s liability. This is especially important for student lettings. In some cases, if there is a guarantor for one individual in a joint tenancy, i.e. a shared house with a single tenancy agreement like that of a student house, then often the guarantor is also liable for the other tenants in the property, as this is a ‘joint and several liability tenancy’. You as the tenant, and your guarantor, should read the deed you are signing carefully, and ensure it is set up so that individual guarantors are liable for individual tenants.

Salford Student Lettings Agency – Mistoria

If you are unsure about any of the terminology used in your Mistoria tenancy agreement, or guarantor agreement, please make an appointment to come and see us to discuss it. We’d be happy to help you, and any prospective guarantor, to ensure everyone in the process understands their responsibilities when renting a Mistoria property. Please contact us by phoning 0800 500 3015.   

We are members of ARLA and NAEA Propertymark which means we meet higher industry standards than the law demands. Our experts undertake regular training to ensure they are up to date with best practice and complex legislative changes so they can offer you the best advice. We are also backed by a Client Money Protection scheme which guarantees your money is protected.

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Take a Tour Of Mistoria Villa

Following a full renovation and high specification upgrade, we can now unveil our flagship development in Bolton: Mistoria Villa. 

Perfect for students and professionals alike, the luxury accommodation boasts 15 spacious en-suite rooms and studios, complemented by well equipped kitchens and comfortable social spaces. The stunning bedrooms, each with a unique contemporary design and finished to a superb standard, are light and airy and all come fitted with desks, chairs, wardrobes, large, comfortable beds and modern furnishings.

A communal living area has also been added, providing the perfect space to socialise, watch TV or catch up with a book. Whether you want to relax with friends or unwind on your own, Mistoria Villa has it all. 

Situated within the Trinity Gateway Zone, the property offers excellent road and rail transport links, including the A666 to Manchester and beyond and Bolton Trinity Street train station, which is just a five minute walk away. Residents can also benefit from easy access both to the bustling Town Centre, with its wide variety of shopping and leisure opportunities and the academically excellent University of Bolton. 

To make life as easy as possible for you, your rent includes all of your utility bills as well as a fibre optic WiFi connection at no extra cost.

Call the office today to speak to one of our helpful team and arrange a viewing.

Take a tour of the property:

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How To Protect Your Student House From Burglars

salford student estate agents

According to police research, students are the group most likely to be targeted by burglars in the UK, so it’s really important you make sure you do everything you can to make your property secure. We’ve written this blog post to help you take the necessary precautions to keep you and your belongings safe. 

Locks

Over 1000 student homes in Manchester are burgled every year. Shockingly, 1 in 3 burglaries occur after the students living there fail to lock their doors and windows before leaving the property. It is therefore essential that you make sure your locks are in good working order and that you use them as often as possible. Burglars want easy access to a property, so by making their lives more difficult, you’ll dramatically reduce the chance of a break-in. If you can, you should also lock your bedroom door when you go out. That way, if one of your housemates forgets to lock their window, burglars won’t be able to steal your belongings too. 

Even if you are in the property, you should lock the doors and windows in the rooms which you’re not using. This is especially important if you are out in the garden as you may not hear someone breaking in. In the unlikely event that it’s hot outside, make sure you lock your windows at night. 

If you have any broken locks or if you feel additional locks are required in your property, notify the Mistoria maintenance team immediately and we will come and help. 

In the Garden

If you have gates that lead into your garden, keep them locked. You should also move wheelie bins away from the house so that would-be burglars cannot use them to climb into the property through an accessible window. On bin collection day, move your bins back into your garden or onto your drive; if they are left out on the pavement, your property will look unoccupied and burglars are more likely to strike. 

Keeping Valuables Safe

Another way to prevent burglaries is to make sure your valuables are hidden out of sight. Opportunist thieves may strike if they notice a laptop in the window within easy reach. When you leave your house for the day, you should therefore hide your valuables in drawers. The effect of having your computer stolen will not just be financial though – it will probably have all of your essays and research on it too and losing those could be disastrous for your academic career. 

Furthermore, if you have just purchased a new piece of tech, tear up the box and put it in your recycling bin. Don’t leave it on show next to the bins or in the window, as that will make it obvious to thieves that there is something worth stealing in your property.

Going out

If you plan to have a big night out and everyone in the house will be out, order a taxi to come and pick you up at the end of the road. That way, it won’t be as clear which house is the empty one to anyone who might be watching. The same should be done when you leave your house at the end of the term. 

You should also purchase a light timer so that when you go out it looks like you’re still in. These are fairly inexpensive and can be bought from supermarkets and DIY stores. If it looks like your house is occupied, thieves will be less likely to attempt to burgle the property. 

When you do go home for the holidays, bring all of your valuables with you. The longer a burglary goes unreported, the less likely you’ll be to recover your stolen items; this could be a number of weeks if you’re on holiday. Therefore, take similar precautions to those listed above when you move out over Christmas or Easter; use timers, make sure everything is locked up and make sure the outside of your house is well kept – don’t let rubbish build up in your front garden as unkempt properties often appear less secure. 

Get Insurance

Sometimes, no amount of preparation can stop your house being burgled. That’s why you need to ensure that you purchase contents insurance for your property as soon as you move in. You might think it’s cheaper to take the risk and not pay for insurance, but if your property is burgled, the cost of replacing all of your stolen items can be crippling.

You should also register all of your valuables on the Immobilise website, where you can record the serial number, make and model of your items. If they are recovered by the police, officers will check this online database to try and return your items to you.  

Further Information

If you require more advice or you are concerned about securing your property, get in contact with the team at Salford student estate agents, Mistoria; we’re always happy to help. We’ve also produced advice for landlords on securing their properties, which can be found here. If you are looking for student accommodation for sale, Salford based Mistoria Estate Agents have a range of properties available. 

 

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Budgeting As A Student

salford student letting agent

The best day of term for every student is when that all important student loan lands in their bank account. But making that money last can be really tough when you’re trying to juggle the costs of going out, doing the food shopping and buying textbooks. Sow how do you live on a budget during your time at university? We thought we’d write this blog post to provide some guidance.

Create a Budget

Unsurprisingly, the most important part of living on a budget is to come up with a plan of how much you can spend each week. If you’ve never budgeted before, you might find that calculating living costs is quite tough, so talk to whoever pays the bills in your household.

To work out how much money is available to you and to prevent yourself going into your overdraft, divide the amount of money in your bank account after your student loan has dropped and your parents have added some funds (though we know that not everyone’s parents can do this) and divide it by the number of weeks in the term. If you’re prone to overspending on nights out, it might be a good idea to open another bank account where you keep most of your money and just transfer over the amount you need each week.

When you make your plan, be aware that the most important thing you need to budget for is your food bill and your rent. If you’re in a Mistoria house, you can rest assured knowing that the rent you pay includes bills, so you don’t have to spend time worrying about any extra costs. You then need to think about how much you’ll spend on nights out and other social events with friends. Remember that if you go to a university in a big city like Liverpool or Manchester, the price of a night out will be higher than you’re used to. 

If your costs for the first term are higher than anticipated (and they probably will be, what with buying textbooks, joining societies and buying bits and pieces to make your house more like a home) you’ll need to make allowances for that in the following term and cut back somewhere. 

Eating Cheaply

A great way to save money is to shop for food as cheaply as you can. Certain shops like Aldi are well known for having really low prices, but if you prefer to shop elsewhere, look for own brand products as they’re usually considerably cheaper than the brands you know. You should also look at the price per gram shown on shop labels. You’ll often find that something that initially looks like the cheaper option is misleading and that another choice will actually save you money. 

Meal Planning 

When you go food shopping, you should have a weekly meal plan in place and stick to it. If you know exactly what you want, you won’t be tempted to buy any extra stuff you don’t need. When it comes to actually preparing your meals, buy and cook in bulk. Try and prepare four meals worth of food in one go and freeze what you don’t eat. That way, you’ll create less waste and save money at the same time. 

Track What You Buy

When you’ve got money in your bank account, it can be hard not to spend it on impulse purchases. Before buying something though, ask yourself whether you really need it, or whether that brand new t-shirt will just end up at the back of the cupboard with all the others you bought and thought you’d wear. When you do buy something, it’s a good idea to track your spending. You could even go as far as making an Excel spreadsheet to do this. You can then see where you’ve spent your money and if you you realise you’ve been spending a bit too much, you can see where to cut back.           

Get a Student Discount Card

For some great savings, you should definitely get a TOTUM card. You can use it to get more than 200 discounts at some of your favourite  brands, both in-store and online. You can get one for just £32 for three years. 

Travelling by train in the UK can be cripplingly expensive, so it’s just as well you can get a 16-25 Railcard, which gives you a third off rail travel. Whilst you can buy one for £70 for three years, you can also get one for free if you open a student bank account with Santander.  

Renting a House with Mistoria 

Did you know that you can live in a high quality student home without breaking the bank? If you’re looking for a property to rent, Salford student letting agent, Mistoria, have a great choice. Speak to a member of our team to discuss your needs.

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Keeping Your Student House Clean

broughton estate agents

Once you’ve moved into your shared student house, it’s not long before the mess starts to build up. We’ve written this article to help you keep on top of the cleaning in your house and stop arguments starting over whose turn it is to scrub the bathroom!

Rota

If you haven’t set up a cleaning rota yet, do so as soon as possible. Sit down together and make sure that all the household chores are shared out equally between every member of the house. Set out the key things that need to be done, such as taking out the rubbish and cleaning the kitchen. Make sure everyone agrees on the schedule and that everyone has a say. Aim to clean everything once a week; you may want to set the same day and time for everyone to do their chores. If you do it regularly, it’ll be far easier to manage. 

Cleaning Products

Ensure there is a store of communal cleaning products that everyone contributes to, but make sure that none contain ingredients that members of the household are allergic to, or that they might object to (if they have been tested on animals, for example) 

Doing the Washing Up 

Deciding whether to do the washing up on a rota or as individuals is up to you. If you do it as part of a rota, you know that everything will be done regularly. However, some people may find that unfair, especially if they use fewer bowls and less cutlery than other household members. If you do it individually, each person will be responsible for their own cleaning, but the chance of people leaving their pans ‘to soak’ is high and plates may soon begin to pile up. 

Communal Areas

If you’re in a communal area like the lounge or kitchen, try and tidy up after yourself. In the bathroom, ask everyone to keep their toiletries in their own rooms, or if you have a cabinet, on each shelf. Don’t leave your various bottles out in the shower as it’ll become impossible to track what’s yours. 

Tidy Up Before You Go Away

If everyone is leaving the house during the holidays, tidy up everything before you vacate the property. Empty the fridge and cabinets of anything that might go off, take the rubbish out and wipe down all surfaces, especially kitchen counters. This will mean you won’t come back to a house that has been taken over by mice and flies.

Student Houses in Salford

Are you looking for a student house for next year? Salford and Broughton estate agents, Mistoria, still have properties available. Speak to a member of the team to find out how we can help you.

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Controversial lettings review website wins backing from students

salford student houses

Controversial lettings review website wins backing from students

A controversial review website which says it can be used to identify “good (and bad) letting agents” has won the backing of a university’s student body.

Marks Out Of Tenancy, which was set up in 2016, says it lists around 20,000 letting agents from across the UK and encourages tenants to review both agents and landlords.

Now it has received support from St Andrews Students’ Association.

A statement from Marks Out Of Tenancy says: “Wanting to better prepare students for living in the private sector, the students’ association has partnered with Marks Out Of Tenancy to provide a platform for sharing experiences and to create transparency about living conditions.”

The website – which also includes information on local areas as well as properties, agents and landlords – claims to allow renters ”to make more informed decisions about who they want to rent from, where they want to live, and what to expect from an area before they sign their tenancy agreement.”

Paloma Paige, the university’s students association president, says: “From the ‘Rent Your Landlord’ survey we ran in 2017, we saw that our students had a real appetite to provide constructive feedback regarding their experiences as tenants. We recognised that by making such information available, students could help their peers navigate the local housing market.”

Meanwhile the website founder, Ben Yarrow, adds: “Balance and fairness is key to the Marks Out Of Tenancy platform, with landlords and letting agents enabled and encouraged to reply to reviews and open a meaningful dialogue with current and potential tenants. We want to improve the experience of all parties involved with the rental process. This is not about naming and shaming, but providing a platform for real engagement.”

This article first appeared in Letting Agent Today in Nov 2018.

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Top Tips for Freshers Vol.3

student housing liverpool

In the third and final post in our series of Freshers blogs, providers of student housing Liverpool and Salford based Mistoria Estate Agents, advise you on how to make the most of Freshers’ Week and beyond…

Join Clubs

No, we don’t mean as a club promoter. (Seriously, we don’t care that its Voodoo Wednesdays, you told us that last week…) At the Fresher’s Fair, you have the opportunity to join potentially hundreds of clubs and societies. Make the most of this opportunity. They range from sports clubs and dance troupes, to the really wacky, like the Humous Society or the Extreme Ironing Society. Don’t try and join every single one, otherwise you’ll be bombarded by emails for the rest of your life, but choose a broad selection that both caters to your interests but also pushes the boat out. If you’re interested but unsure, many societies offer free taster sessions.

Whilst you’re wandering around the Freshers’ Fair choosing clubs, milk the stalls for all they’re worth. Get all the freebies you can. You can easily get a lifetime supply of pens there, but also vouchers for free pizza and snacks.

Get In On The Discounts

As a student, you can get hold of an incredible number of discounts. Get a UNiDAYS or NUS Extra card to get massive reductions in most high street shops. Even if a shop doesn’t actually advertise that it offers student discounts, it’s worth asking anyway, as many do.

Cooking

Whether you decide to cook with your housemates on a rota, or do it just for yourself, try and bulk-buy and bulk-cook. Try to make enough for three meals when you cook, and freeze the portions you don’t eat for a later date. This will save you lots of money, and will mean you don’t buy things you don’t need. Similarly, don’t shop on an empty stomach; you’ll be more likely to buy rubbish. It’s worth getting your hands on a cookbook before you arrive at your new house. You can get student ones with quick recipes using cheap ingredients. If you’re not a great cook, try and learn some recipes beforehand. As amazing as living off takeaway kebabs sounds, it can really destroy you.

The First Lecture

When you first start university, you may feel a bit too relaxed about going to lectures. Don’t sleep through them though, even if the hangover is awful. Sometimes, later in the year, you might feel too ill to go to a lecture here or there. Don’t make a habit of missing them though. Even if you take notes on a laptop, bring a pen and paper too, in case your computer runs out of battery. Sometimes, actually writing out your notes can help you remember them better.

Don’t be scared to shout out ideas in a lecture. Everyone is just waiting for someone else to answer, and there’s nothing worse than an awkward pause after a lecturer has asked a question. If you have queries after a lecture, don’t hesitate to email the lecturer or go to their office. It’s what they’re there for, and given how much you’re paying for your education, you should make the most of it.

The First Assignment

Your first assignment can be a daunting prospect, but don’t fret, it’s doable. Lecturers are well aware that it’s your first real taste of uni work. The most important thing is that you don’t leave it until the night before it’s due. That just causes unnecessary stress. Plan what you’ve got to do in advance, and begin reading. Try to work on the essay in chunks, rather than all in one go. This way you won’t get bored, and it won’t look rushed.

Don’t leave referencing until the end either. Trying to find out where you got a quotation about 1st century BC Roman cheese production can be incredibly frustrating, and isn’t something you want to be doing at 2am. The other thing you don’t want to be doing in the early hours is crying when your computer crashes and you lose your work. Back-up all your work.

Mistoria Estate Agents

If you’re still looking for student housing Liverpool and Salford based Mistoria Estate Agents are here to help. We still have a range of properties available in both cities. To find out more about what we can offer you, call 0800 500 3015, email info@mistoria.co.uk, or fill in the contact form here.

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Top Tips For Freshers Vol.2

liverpool student homes

In the second article in our series of Freshers blog posts, experts in Salford and Liverpool student homes, Mistoria Estate Agents, give you top tips for a successful start to your university life…

Get Creative

When you move into your student accommodation (Mistoria Estate Agents have many Salford and Liverpool student homes available), start decorating your room. Put up photographs of friends from home, your family, your dog, your pet snail, whatever makes you feel happy. Put up posters and some plants, too. Having a room that isn’t entirely bare will help you feel less homesick. And don’t worry, feeling homesick is normal. Try and meet up with your new-found friends and go somewhere together to keep your mind off it. Don’t forget about university health and support centres for more formal help. You can also explore student mental health websites such as Student Minds if you’re really struggling to settle in.

Get a calendar and put it up in a prominent position in your room. The number of events you plan to go to can be difficult to keep track of, so record everything. You might also want to fill it with your lecture times too.

Work with your housemates to try and make the rest of the house more homely. Take this as an opportunity to organise how bills are going to be split, and how you’re going to share out cooking and cleaning rotas as well. If you decide to get a TV, remember to get a TV licence. If you don’t have one, but watch TV, you can be fined up to £1000. It’s not worth the risk.

Make Friends

Easier said than done, but it IS possible, even for the shyest person. Really try and make an effort to socialise. It can be exhausting, but it’s well worth it. Go to as many events as you can to meet more people. Don’t try and pretend to be someone you’re not; people will see right through that. But one idea might be to fake-it-til-you-make-it. Sometimes if you force yourself to be sociable and confident, that’s exactly what you’ll become. Consider joining Facebook groups with your future coursemates before you arrive. It can be a great way to start to make friends without the initial pressure of meeting people face-to-face.

Keeping Up The Friendships

Not all the friendships you make in Fresher’s will last; don’t expect them to. Don’t feel obliged to stick with the first person you meet. Yes, initially, linking up with one person to help you make more friends is a good approach, but you’ll quickly find other friends. Similarly, don’t get into a Fresher’s relationship with the first person who shows an interest in you. You’ve got three or more years for that; think of the huge number of other people you’re going to meet in that time.

Take Part in Fresher’s Events

Don’t lock yourself up in your room for long periods. You don’t want to be known as the hermit housemate. Make the most of all of the Fresher’s events the university puts on for you. However, don’t be that person, and drink to excess. You’ll just end up embarrassing yourself. Eat something before you go out drinking to avoid unfortunate occurrences. If drinking isn’t your thing, remember that alcohol isn’t the be all and end all of university life, and that there are many other options for you. Even if you do drink, don’t think you can’t join the non-drinking events. Sometimes a night off from the partying can do you a world of good. Don’t let FOMO dictate your life!

Fresher’s events aren’t just limited to partying. The university might organise tours and trips to cultural spots in the city. Go to these not only to make friends, but also to orientate yourself. You might also want to find out where your lectures are and go and find the buildings before term starts properly. That way, you’ll know how to get to your lectures on the first day, and won’t end up panicking when you can’t find a room.

Mistoria Estate Agents – Providing Excellent Salford and Liverpool Student Homes

If you’re still looking for Salford and Liverpool student homes for next year, Mistoria are here to help. We have a range of properties available in both cities. To find out more about what we can offer you, call 0800 500 3015, email info@mistoria.co.uk, or fill in the contact form here.

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Top Tips for Freshers Vol.1

liverpool student houses

For the first in a series of blog posts, Mistoria Estate Agents, specialists in Salford and Liverpool student houses, asked a current student to tell us, and you, their advice for Freshers’ Week and beyond. Here’s what they said…

Don’t Worry

The most important advice for Freshers is not to worry. We know, it’s hard not to. But it’s normal to feel anxious or nervous about leaving home, especially as moving-in day looms. Remember though, that everyone else is in the same boat. Even if the first people you meet don’t seem to be worried, they definitely are. They’re just trying to put on a brave face. Don’t worry if you don’t settle in immediately when other people seem to be doing so. People settle at different times.

Plan Ahead

Before you leave for university, make sure you have everything you need. Many student websites have itineraries you can use, but we thought we’d make some suggestions too. Remember, you don’t have to pack absolutely everything you own. If you do forget something important, you can still buy it in Liverpool or Salford. Set up a student bank account straight away. They often offer better interest rates than regular accounts, and have large free overdrafts (which you shouldn’t need to use, but give you some peace of mind.) Don’t be sucked in by freebies either – some offers are better than others. Make sure you have all the documents you need for your arrival, such as your letter of acceptance and ID. Check any information the university might have sent you via email, and check their social media pages for useful updates.

Remember to pack flu medicine as well. You WILL get Freshers’ Flu. THERE IS NO ESCAPING IT. Bringing paracetamol and Lemsip* will make your days of suffering just that bit more bearable. Register with a doctor’s office near to your new house too. You can find your nearest GP here.
*other branded remedies are available!

Finally, pack lots of fancy dress. Freshers’ Week in particular, but pretty much every night out after, revolves around some kind of outfit, and there’s often a competition for the best one.

Make A Budget

University might be the first time you’ve had to budget, but budget you must, if you want to avoid spending half the term eating Pot Noodles. Plan how much money will leave your account each month in bills, rent, and food costs, and allow for extra emergency costs too. Remember, you’ll need money for textbooks, but you can get these secondhand for a much better price than new. You’ll invariably spend a lot more in Fresher’s Week than at any other time, so you might want to make a mini budget just for that. Saving up some extra money over summer before uni just for Freshers’ is a good idea. Don’t feel pressured to spend money you don’t have, and try not to go into your overdraft unless it’s absolutely necessary.

Mistoria Estate Agents – Provider of Salford and Liverpool Student Houses

If you’re still looking for Salford and Liverpool student houses for next year, our last bit of advice is not to worry. Mistoria Estate Agents are here to help; we still have a range of properties available in both cities. To find out more about what we can offer you, call 0800 500 3015, email info@mistoria.co.uk, or fill in the contact form here.